Traveling to America While Muslim

Sulaika Abokor, a Somali-born elementary-school teacher in London, dreams of “a road trip from Seattle to California.” The 34-year-old was planning a vacation to Seattle this summer to see a friend who was recently married. She fell in love with the green, outdoorsy city when she last visited in 2010. But, because of the Trump administration’s travel ban prohibiting most visitors from six predominantly Muslim countries, she now says, “That’s not going to happen.”

Contrary to recent reports of the United States being inundated with international travelers this year, with international arrivals and travel-related spending in the United States up in 2017 compared with the same period last year, a subset of travelers — British Muslims — is rethinking its plans. While no statistics in Britain are available, a significant number of British Muslims say they are eschewing United States travel in light of the ban, according to Muslim officials and anecdotal evidence from interviews in Britain.

“This concern is unlikely to be held just by a small minority of British Muslims,” said Miqdaad Versi, assistant secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain, the country’s largest Muslim organization. “Some British Muslims don’t want to go to the United States because of the hassle of traveling there.” There are concerns, he said, “because of the fears of what might happen when they travel or arrive there.”

Ms. Abokor is among them. Like me, Ms. Abokor is a British citizen who has a dual nationality; the other is from Somalia, one of the Muslim-majority countries singled out by the ban. For her, a trip to the United States is “no longer attractive.” She said she does not feel confident enough to try boarding a flight to Seattle.

“I don’t want to risk being turned away or having a hard time getting in,” Ms. Abokor said. “A place that does not want my people, then you don’t deserve my tourist money.”

Among my circle of friends and acquaintances in London’s Muslim scene, especially those of us who have dual citizenship, traveling to the United States is now fraught with uncertainty, fear and insult because of President Trump’s travel ban, which was partly revived in June after a Supreme Court ruling. The temporary ban, which had been blocked for months by lower courts, has upended many lives, including those of vulnerable refugees from around the world. Some working professionals, like me in London, have had concrete plans to visit in the coming months. But we worry about taking the risk of being questioned for hours at a United States airport or, worse, being sent home. For some of us, America is no longer a welcoming destination.

Ms. Abokor said her United States travel plans came to an abrupt end following the Supreme Court’s ruling last month that the Trump administration could mostly enforce his original executive order issued one week into his presidency in January. She said the climate of traveling in the United States feels too disturbing. The Supreme Court on July 19 temporarily upheld broad restrictions against refugees entering the United States but allowed grandparents and other relatives of American residents to come while legal challenges to the Trump administration’s travel ban move forward. .

I feel for Ms. Abokor. As a 32-year-old British-Somali journalist living in London, I found myself caught up in the travel ban chaos. When the ban went into effect in January, I was in New York City on a fellowship at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. I needed to fly back to London on Feb. 4 to visit family, but I wasn’t sure I would be allowed back into the United States because of my dual citizenship. I was intensely questioned by customs and immigration officials at Kennedy International Airport. (My passport stamps showed travel in recent years to Somalia, where I have family. I fled Somalia as a child refugee because of war, violence and famine, arriving in London at age 9. I later became a naturalized British citizen.)

At J.F.K., I was eventually allowed entry into the country. It probably helped that I carried a letter from Columbia University attesting to the fact that I was on a weeklong Dart Center Ochberg fellowship focusing on trauma and the reporting of violence, and that I also had the correct visa. Even so, when I returned to the United States in March, I was so worried about how I might be treated that I called friends so they would know where I was in case something happened to me.

“Traveling while Muslim” is the reality that many of us face these days. I hope to return this fall to the United States to see friends in New York, but I wonder whether I will be able to keep panic at bay when my plane lands and I must face customs and immigration officials. In those anxious moments, I am reduced to my ethno-religious origin. Not an individual, I am seen as just a Muslim — viewed only as being a possible threat.

Sadly, as fears of global terrorism have heightened, my experiences this year do not count as my worst. In May 2015, when I flew to New York to celebrate a friend’s 30th birthday, I was taken aside at J.F.K. and told to sit down, then questioned by one official after another. It was a humiliating and terrifying experience. But this year’s travel ban, shutting out citizens from entire countries with Muslim majorities, has shaken me to my core.

What is especially disheartening to me and many of my Muslim friends is that our British-ness — our love of English breakfast tea with buttery biscuits, our obsession with soccer clubs (mine being the Arsenal club in North London), our British slang and mannerisms that lead our Somali parents, rolling their eyes, to call us “fish and chips,” not even our valid travel documents — protect us.

What the Magician Penn Jillette Can’t Travel Without

The magician and author Penn Jillette performs live shows with his partner, Teller, in Las Vegas 46 weeks of the year. Their television show, “Penn & Teller: Fool Us!,” started its fourth season on July 13. “Presto!,” Mr. Jillette’s book about losing more than 100 pounds, was published last summer.

He lives in Las Vegas (“Las Vegas is like living on the moon; nothing green can live here. It’s desolate, a kind of beauty you can only appreciate when you get old”) but travels for work.

Exploring is not a priority, he said. “When I’m on the road, I’m very different from Teller and the rest of the crew because I don’t usually leave my room. The farthest I’ll go is to the nearest Starbucks where I’ll drink coffee and work on my computer.”

Still, he recently spent time in the Southern Hemisphere for a movie, and he was surprised at how much he liked it. “I loved Tasmania, that it looks like you’re on another planet … the trees are upside-down. Some things just look totally different. In Australia, everything’s trying to kill you — spiders, snakes, octopuses! Everything down there is poisonous and venomous and hates you. I didn’t like that, but in New Zealand, nothing’s trying to kill you. In New Zealand, you can run naked through the woods and you’re O.K. And I did. And I was.”For travel, he uses a packing and storage service called DUFL. “Someone in my office clicks on the icon and two suitcases are packed up with my clean clothes, and when I get to the hotel they’re there in my room. Sometimes they put in a sweatshirt with a picture of Jack Kerouac’s typewriter on it, because I’m essentially a beatnik. A beatnik that stays at the Four Seasons and has someone else move his luggage around.”

Deck of cards

It’s a perfectly ordinary deck of cards. Honest! Honest! I like to practice. People usually think practicing with a deck of cards is a lot of finger-flicking, which I used to do, but people who are, like, 20 are so much better that it’s a little bit disheartening. I do a lot of mental and memorization stuff with cards, so I have them with me to play with. The problem is that some people know you from television as being a magician, and if you pull out a deck of cards you seem in some way impolite. It’s like being on an airplane with someone who pulls out a guitar; it’s kind of embarrassing, like they want you to ask them to do a song or something.”

Computer bag

“I carry probably more electronics than you’d think a human being would carry. I carry the biggest MacBook, fully loaded, with terabytes of space. Which is stupid because I use it essentially for word processing. I also have the iPad Pro. That’s what The New York Times looks best on. I don’t ever agree with The New York Times but I read it all the way through every day.” My Bose wireless noise-canceling headphones that I use on airplanes. And money, so if someone steals the bag they won’t be disappointed that they’re just getting a computer that’s equipped to N.S.A. standards. At least they’re getting something for their trouble.”

A Monkees hat

“Never mind the Beatles, I’m a Monkees fan and they are three-quarters American. So it’s a patriotic hat. I am proud to call Mike Nesmith a friend and I’ve met them all. When I have a show I don’t wear a hat because I want my hair to be perfect, but on travel days I’m wearing my Monkees hat all day long.”

Almonds

“They are always in my travel bag. I always feel like — even though I don’t eat anymore — I’m going to have this panic and want to eat something, so I have almonds with me that are never opened.”

Things to read

“I read on my iPad. I won’t touch paper, I hate it. People hated me before electronics because I’d buy a book and stick it in my back pocket, and as I’d finish reading chapters I’d rip them out so there was less to carry. My library is exclusively stuff that I believe less than 10 other people have copies of. Right now I’m on a [Yuval] Harari jag; I just read ‘Sapiens’ and ‘Homo Deus.’ I always have the Bible that I’m reading, because I’m an atheist. And I always have ‘Moby Dick’ because I’m an American.”

Places to Go in 2017

Canada

A northern neighbor is a world to explore.

Canada is huge — the second-largest country by area. It’s also a world unto itself, with cosmopolitan cities, barely explored natural wonders and everything in between. And this is the year to visit: In honor of the 150th anniversary of its confederation, when the original colonies came together as one country, Canada is rolling out the welcome mat. All of the country’s more than 200 national parks and historic sites are offering free admission through the year, from the turquoise lakes and mountain peaks of Banff in Alberta to the rolling dunes and red sandstone cliffs of Prince Edward Island along the Atlantic Coast to the newest reserve, the glacial-rounded Mealy Mountains in Labrador. Meanwhile, in the capital, Ottawa, a full year of celebration is planned; more events will be on offer in Montreal, which turns 375. And did we mention the exchange rate? A weak Canadian dollar means American travelers get more for their money. So 2017 offers an ideal time to go north. 

Atacama DesertChile

New ways to explore the world’s highest desert.

The Atacama draws adventure seekers and stargazers to its vast, otherworldly landscape of wind-carved dunes and kaleidoscopic salt lakes. Sunrise balloon rides, which started in August, reveal its staggering beauty from above. The luxurious, recently renovated Explora Atacama hotel reopened in December; overnight rates include guided desert excursions and nighttime access to the hotel’s on-site observatory, equipped with one of Chile’s largest privately-owned telescopes. 

AgraIndia

Beyond the Taj Mahal, new attractions beckon.

Navigating the stunning, sprawling Taj Mahal will get easier when an orientation center opens this year, but 2017 also promises new reasons to venture beyond: Nearby streets have been repaved; the Agra Pavilion, a glass-walled dining complex, will host more than a dozen vendors and restaurants; and the Mughal Museum, a collaboration with the architect David Chipperfield and Studio Archohm, has broken ground. In addition, India’s fastest train and longest expressway now cut travel time from Delhi and Lucknow. 

A Maltese Hotel with Baroque Design and Mediterranean Flair

Basics

Housed in a traditional Maltese townhouse dating back 400 years, this 13-room boutique hotel represents the Mediterranean island nation’s varied cultural influences — Roman, Arab, French and British, to name a few. From marble floors and exposed limestone walls to brown rattan furniture and Oriental rugs, the décor exudes both Baroque and Mediterranean flair. Opened in June 2016, the restored property has a lobby that leads to a courtyard revealing inner balconies on each of the four floors. Rooms can be reached via a tiny glass elevator or a dizzying steel staircase with a magnificent light fixture that seems to descend from the sky. In February, the hotel opened a spa below ground where guests can soak in a whirlpool beneath a vaulted ceiling.

Location

In the center of Valletta, the country’s capital and a city on Unesco’s World Heritage list, the hotel is about a 40-minute drive from Malta International Airport and a short walk from the Grand Harbor, Lower Barrakka Gardens and St. John’s Co-Cathedral, among other sites.

The Room

From “Romantica” to “Ecologica,” each room has a different name and décor. We were pleasantly surprised by our spacious second-floor “Religioso” suite. It featured two plump twin beds (you can request a queen) with ornate wooden headboards, and a sofa bed under a fresco-style wall print that dominated the space. With scant natural light from the one courtyard-facing window and a color scheme of red, gold and beige, the room evoked a holy sanctuary. But it also radiated opulence, with furnishings including a vintage Gothic armoire with tall mirrors and a giant silver candelabrum (sans candles).

Lessons Learned from Years with Vacations

You should know that not all of the available villa rentals options are similar and thus, you need to set aside a portion of your time in doing research. The good thing is, this is exactly what we will talk about in this article. I suggest that you keep on reading to help you find villa rentals that are well worth of your hard earned money.

Tip number 1. Don’t rush – you must never hurry when reserving a vacation rentals. When you try looking for it again later, you may feel afraid that it’ll be gone. Yes it is true that the options for villas are quickly booked but this doesn’t indicate that you can use it as an excuse to hurry; rather try to know first what you really want than paying for a place you will not be enjoying to stay at. It will be recommended to shop around and you’ll soon find what it is you want.

Tip number 2. Repeat customer – if you’ve rented a villa before, then you might be able to get a discount for being their repeat customer. There are many vacation rentals by owner who like to reward those that have given them with lots of business. This is otherwise considered as a token of appreciation. You can possibly earn bigger savings for doing repeat visits and referring others to stay there as well.

Tip number 3. Package deals – getting an all-in package deal is a good choice as it lets you get flights, transportation and vacation homes for rent for a price of one. This will be less expensive on your part instead of buying every item on its own. You must be able to customize the package at the same time to be able to make it how you want it to be.

Tip number 4. Off season – remember that villa options are sought both in summer and spring months. You can save more for the same location by having a visit during winter and fall. Truth is, you might enjoy this time of the year even more as there are fewer people around. And if you check in throughout the week, you can additionally get more savings. It is going to increase the prices of everything if you plan your vacation on a weekend mainly because of the demand for the said days. If you want to find good vacation house rentals to stay for a lesser price, avoid holidays as these are sure to be very expensive.

Tip number 5. Promo codes – always take time in opening up a second browser on your PC whenever you see a promo code. As a matter of fact, this is a discount code in which you need to copy and paste the code to the final checkout to get whatever the promo inside.

Smart Ideas: Trips Revisited

A List of 7 Places You Should Never Miss During Your Next Trip to Vietnam

With its rich and dynastic history, Vietnam is an amazing country for your next holiday trip. Though much has been written about the country, there are little tales about the beautiful palaces and the stunning landscapes. The cooperative local people give travelers a concrete reason to spend more days there, not to mention the traditional dishes with natural aromas you ought to miss once your trip is over. If you are arranging sightseeing in Vietnam, the following places should not miss in your checklist.

Ho Chi Minh City
This is one of the famous contemporary cities of Vietnam, which dates back to the previous century activities. However, it has transformed to be one of the modern places with lots of opportunities and much for travelers to explore. While planning a trip to Ho Chi Minh City, dedicate a visiting day for the Cu Chi tunnels as this is the archive of the country’s latest history. Another must-visit place is the Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica to see the long-established French cathedral.

Hoi An
For those seeking to see the traditional crafts and structures owned by local people, the Hoi An is the place to be. It is the place for travelers to see the customary homes and interact with the local’s culture including traditional foods and their system of agriculture. More things to explore awaits you while in Hoi An. There are artifacts to see, religious teachings to listen, and cultural customs to learn.

Phong Nha
The caves of Phong Nha is another amazing place every traveler need to visit. The caves are in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites so that they can be preserved for the current and future generations. Just after getting out of the caves, a few meters away you will see a national park. It is a home to different animal species including monkeys, bears, snakes, and many kinds of insects.

Hue
The city has a lot of fun for travelers. As one of the historical cities that was inhabited by kings, some of the major ancient architectural structures are found here. One of the structures is the Citadel found in the city center. As you shop around, remember to order for some delicious traditional Vietnamese foods in any of the kiosks and booths near you.

Sapa
Ifyou love hiking, take your fun to the Vietnam mountains. A local guide can help you trail through the rice paddies, up and down the misty peaks while exploring the real wonders of nature. You will have great moments while hiking in the misty peaks.

Nha Trang
Your trip deserves some relaxation at the Nha Trang beach. You can choose to enjoy different types of watersports available or just opt for scuba diving. The place is so decent with beautiful resorts and luxury hotels.

Ha Long Bay
Lastly, complete your trip at the Ha Long Bay. There are lots of things to do for adults and kids. You will have lots of fun in the caves and jungles, while a boat trip along the Ha Long Bay will create a memorable excursion in Vietnam.

On the Road: The Tour de France

This summer the world’s most famous cycle race pedals off from Dusseldorf on 1 July. For the next three weeks, elite cyclists will compete stage by stage as they loop around Germany, Belgium, and France. Glory awaits whoever crosses the finishing line first in Paris on 23 July. All those who come behind can at least say they completed the gruelling 104th Tour de France.

The Tour de France itself is open only to professional cyclists, but that’s not to say that you can’t get a taste of the action. You can bike the same route, or follow stage by stage as a spectator. Here are the highlights you can expect to see if you follow the route, plus our practical tips to make it happen.

Dusseldorf

The very first stage of this year’s Tour de France starts and ends in the German city of Dusseldorf. It’s a flat 13 km time trial through the city streets, mostly along the banks of the Rhine and therefore wonderfully flat. You can follow a similar route on a guided bike tour of the city, or meander your own way through the Old and New Towns. The parks and tree-lined promenade by the riverside are particularly pretty, and a great way to ease yourself into cycling, especially if you’re not terribly fit.

Liège

Stage 2 of the Tour de France is a long distance stage: 203 km from Dusseldorf across the border to Liège in Belgium. There are two short climbs along the way, and you’ll see a great deal of western Germany’s countryside as you cycle.

Though this section of the route is not overly arduous, you will be spending a lot of hours in the saddle. It’s essential you wear the right shorts or tights to avoid chafing. Jack Wolfskin’s Gravity Flex Tights are stretchy and breathable, and importantly are also waterproof — helpful for the unpredictable weather in Northern Europe!

When you arrive into Liège, don’t be deceived by the first industrial appearances. Climb the Montagne de Bueren steps for a rewarding city view, and treat yourself to a well-earned beer at the top.

Troyes

Cycling and drinking wine may not always go together, but there are few things more pleasurable in life than biking through French vineyards. The organisers of the Tour de France know that well, and so Stage 7 runs 213 km through the vineyards of Burgundy from Troyes to Nuits-Saint-Georges. Champagne and Rosé des Riceys are just two of the local specialities: you can also keep your energy levels up with Troyes andouillette, Chaource cheese, and Prunelle de Troyes, a particularly potent prune-based liquor.

Bergerac

Competitors in the Tour de France take a much-needed rest day in the Dordogne before starting on Stage 10, the 178 km leg from Perigueux to Bergerac. The terrain here is a little hillier, but the rewards for visitors are ample: the famous cave paintings of Lascaux, truffles and foie gras for the foodies, and the attractions of Bergerac.

Bergerac’s Old Town looks as if it was made for tourism. The timber framed houses are medieval, there are lively markets in the squares, and you can wander along the bank of the Dordogne River down to the historic quay.

Rodez

By the time you reach Stage 14 (182 km), you’ll need to raise your game. The hills here might look photogenic, but as they rise higher and higher, your legs will start to burn.

Be grateful that you’re on a modern, lightweight bicycle. The first time that British riders competed in the Tour de France was in 1955, and their equipment and clothing looked very different indeed. The Wearwell Cycle Company, who sponsored riders in that first British team, have relaunched their collection in 2017, combining a hint of 1950s vintage style with the latest materials and designs. You can look the part whilst riding in complete comfort.

When you do get to Rodez at the end of the stage, inevitably you’ll be exhausted. Once you’ve recovered, do allow some time for sightseeing, however. Rodez’s cathedral is a masterpiece of gothic architecture; there’s an excellent circular walking tour around the Old Town; and the local park, Domaine de Combelles, covers 300 acres.

Salon-de-Provence

The longest stage of the tour, Stage 19, runs through the lavender fields and olive groves of Provence. It might look utterly idyllic but it’s tough on the legs, especially in the first part of the day. Even the pros are hard-pushed to complete the 223 km in under 17 hours.

You are heading for Salon-de-Provence. This year is the first time that the Tour de France has ever been through, though the town is a regular feature in other long distance road races such as the Paris-Nice Peloton. Come here to visit the 12th century Château de l’Empéri and the tomb of Nostradamus in the Saint-Laurent Collegiate Church. If your trip coincides with the Du son au Balcon festival in August, you’ll also hear the central square pulsing as DJs mix the latest tracks from the balcony of the town hall.

Paris

Everyone’s heard of the Maillot Jaune — the yellow jersey — of the Tour de France, and on the final race day, that’s what is on everyone’s mind. It’s considered bad form for other riders to don that colour shirt, but if you want to feel like a winner on your own bicycle ride, by all means flash some canary yellow.

The 21st and final stage of the Tour de France is from Montgeron through Paris to the Champs-Élysées. It’s a 103 km ride and when the roads are cleared for the race, classed as a sprint. If you’re competing with the Parisian traffic, however, your pace will inevitably be curtailed.

It’s in Paris that the excitement of the race builds to a peak, and where as a spectator you’ll find the best vantage points. Arrive in good time if you want a spot on the Quai d’Orsay or Pont Alexandre III; you stand a better chance in the grounds of the Grand Palais where there’s rather more room.

Watching the race reach its triumphal end on the Champs-Élysées is an emotional sight. And that’s even more true if you’ve cycled all — or even part — of the way yourself. Make time this summer for the Tour de France, the greatest cycle race of them all.

Great see sights on China

The unmoving landscapes of the Silk Road have enchanted travellers for millennia. Sights along the route have lasted down through the ages, from a time when monks travelled these roads bringing Buddhism back from south Asia, and traders exchanged silk for goods and spices.

Made up of a series of roads connecting Chinese capitals with south Asia, Europe and the Mediterranean, a voyage down the Silk Road remains one of China’s most epic journeys. Travelling the length of this route today, with its flaming red mountains, towering sand dunes and alpine lakes, still offers a very real sense of what ancient traders experienced. And in 2014, UNESCO listed the entire 5000km Tian Shan Corridor as a World Heritage Site.

Luckily, the Silk Road is ever-more accessible from the rest of Chinathanks to the opening of a new high-speed rail line through Xinjiang. This train will eventually connect the furthest reaches of China’s northwestern province to Xi’an, Beijing and beyond. Here we explore a must-see list of its east-to-west sights.

Army of Terracotta Warriors

Painstakingly cast as guardians for Qin Shi Huang’s – the first emperor of China – safe passage into the afterlife, the Army Of Terracotta Warriors was discovered in 1974. Since then, thousands of warriors, archers and chariots have been unearthed and remain on display just outside the city of Xi’an in Shaanxi province. Xi’an is the first stop along an itinerary of the Silk Road from east to west – it was the capital of Chinese empires variously in ancient periods and its strategic north-central location on the Guangzhong Plain makes it a gateway from eastern China to the wild west. Today, Xi’an is a busy provincial capital home to numerous ethnic minorities, mainly Hui Muslims.

Labrang Monastery

One of the most important monasteries in the Yellow Hat sect of Tibetan Buddhism, Labrang Monastery in Xiahe was once home to 4000 monks and echoes of a time when Buddhism passed through this part of the world on its great journey through China, from south Asia to the Far East. Today, Labrang Monastery is home to 1800 monks and its grand prayer halls and intricate yak-butter sculptures remain a draw for visitors and monks alike.

Culinary adventures in northern Kyushu

Fukuoka and Saga prefectures, in northern Kyūshū, are accessible places to start a food-inspired tour of the region. From ever-popular ramen to the more nuanced flavours of fermented vinegar, here is a small selection of the many local specialities worth savouring on your trip.

Ramen in Fukuoka

Any conversation about food in this corner of Kyūshū has to begin with ramen (and for some it ends right there, too). The ubiquitous noodles may have their origins in China, but they are hugely popular in Japan, with every region having its particular variations. Fukuoka is the country’s top ramen destination, famous for its signature tonkotsu ramen, also called Hakata or Nagahama ramen: straight, thin noodles in a thick, rich pork-bone-based broth. You can slurp back a bowl at one of the many food stalls around Fukuoka city. There are about 150 of these hawker-style stalls (yatai in Japanese), which typically have a simple counter with a few stools and start service in the evenings. Most stalls set up along the river in the Nakasu area, in the Tenjin area, and in Nagahama near the docks.

Or, for ramen indoors, head to 40-year-old Ichiran, where customers dine in individual cubicles (presumably so one can give the noodles their full deserved attention). Fukuoka city is also home to the now international Ippudo ramen restaurant chain. There are a few Ippudo dotted around the city (the flagship store, established 1985, is at 1-13-14 Daimyo); a collaboration between Ippudo and the Kyushu-based Drum Tao performance group means that the ‘Ippudo Tao’ store at 1-13-13 Tenjin (ippudo.com/store/tao_fukuoka) has taiko drums as decor.

Kudzu in Akizuki castle town

All that remains of the castle in Akizuki is a large gate and some hulking stone-wall ruins, but the 800-year-old village still draws visitors, especially when the laneways flush with pink in cherry-blossom season. Amid the old samurai residences, pretty bridges and temples of the historic centre is the similarly historic store Hirokyu Kuzu Honpo (0946-25-0215; 532 Akizuki), a 9th-generation family business. The speciality here is kudzu (or kuzu), also called Japanese arrowroot, a kind of woody vine whose large roots are processed into a starch powder. Heated with water and set, kudzu forms the basis of Japanese summertime favourites such as kuzu-mochi – a chilled firm jelly-like ‘cake’ sweetened with syrup or topped with nutty-tasting kinako(roasted soybean flour).

Best cocktail bars in the world

The city boasts more bars than you can shake a cocktail stick at, from spectacular rooftop views to hole-in-the-wall music joints, and whether you prefer to be shaken or stirred, our list will help you find your perfect watering hole.

Take in the view from Giudecca’s Skyline Bar

There are plenty of reasons to love rooftop Skyline Bar, despite its slightly awkward location on Giudecca island. First off, you get a free shuttle service from the city across the Giudecca Canal. Secondly, it offers great views of southern Venice and thus multiple photo ops. Then there is the lengthy – and idiosyncratically translated – cocktail menu. A nice touch has been to provide a Venetian take on the classics, with the drinks covering the six sestieri (districts) of the city. The free boat ride makes a cocktail (€16-20) at this glamorous hotel bar an affordable treat.

Join the young, hip crowd at Osteria da Filo

Known to locals as ‘La Poppa’, this buzzing watering hole has a great wine list and cocktail selection (€3.50-6), including the Zaza, a mean house speciality involving copious amounts of rum and fresh ginger. One of the few venues in Venice offering live music (early evening on Wednesdays), Osteria da Filo is crammed with a young hipster and alternative crowd. On Wednesdays, arrive early to grab a comfy sofa or seat near the stage; alternatively, squeeze yourself in at the bar. The music ranges from traditional swing to contemporary jazz with local and international acts performing. The staff are friendly and the mood convivial.

Bring out your inner Bond on the Terrazza Danieli

A Venetian institution, the Danieli Hotel has been frequented by James Bond, as well as featuring in 2010 comedy The Tourist. From May to September, the Terrazza Danieli is open for aperitifs on the roof. Take in the stunning views of San Giorgio Maggiore and the Doge’s Palace as you sip on a soothing Bellini (cocktails €15-18) after the heat of the day. In winter, head to the ground floor bar for a cosier aperitif.

Drink in the luxury at the Bar Longhi

The newly restored Bar Longhi at the Gritti Palace hotel is sumptuous, elegant and the epitome of luxury. The interior is all marble and Murano glass and even boasts paintings by eighteenth-century artist and local son Pietro Longhi. The bar has a delicious eponymous signature cocktail, the Longhi, consisting of Campari, vermouth and stock orange liqueur, as well as an extensive cocktail list (€19-22). Sink into a plush sofa as you look out onto the Grand Canal in one of the loveliest hotels in the city.