Monthly Archives: May 2017

Lessons Learned from Years with Vacations

You should know that not all of the available villa rentals options are similar and thus, you need to set aside a portion of your time in doing research. The good thing is, this is exactly what we will talk about in this article. I suggest that you keep on reading to help you find villa rentals that are well worth of your hard earned money.

Tip number 1. Don’t rush – you must never hurry when reserving a vacation rentals. When you try looking for it again later, you may feel afraid that it’ll be gone. Yes it is true that the options for villas are quickly booked but this doesn’t indicate that you can use it as an excuse to hurry; rather try to know first what you really want than paying for a place you will not be enjoying to stay at. It will be recommended to shop around and you’ll soon find what it is you want.

Tip number 2. Repeat customer – if you’ve rented a villa before, then you might be able to get a discount for being their repeat customer. There are many vacation rentals by owner who like to reward those that have given them with lots of business. This is otherwise considered as a token of appreciation. You can possibly earn bigger savings for doing repeat visits and referring others to stay there as well.

Tip number 3. Package deals – getting an all-in package deal is a good choice as it lets you get flights, transportation and vacation homes for rent for a price of one. This will be less expensive on your part instead of buying every item on its own. You must be able to customize the package at the same time to be able to make it how you want it to be.

Tip number 4. Off season – remember that villa options are sought both in summer and spring months. You can save more for the same location by having a visit during winter and fall. Truth is, you might enjoy this time of the year even more as there are fewer people around. And if you check in throughout the week, you can additionally get more savings. It is going to increase the prices of everything if you plan your vacation on a weekend mainly because of the demand for the said days. If you want to find good vacation house rentals to stay for a lesser price, avoid holidays as these are sure to be very expensive.

Tip number 5. Promo codes – always take time in opening up a second browser on your PC whenever you see a promo code. As a matter of fact, this is a discount code in which you need to copy and paste the code to the final checkout to get whatever the promo inside.

Smart Ideas: Trips Revisited

A List of 7 Places You Should Never Miss During Your Next Trip to Vietnam

With its rich and dynastic history, Vietnam is an amazing country for your next holiday trip. Though much has been written about the country, there are little tales about the beautiful palaces and the stunning landscapes. The cooperative local people give travelers a concrete reason to spend more days there, not to mention the traditional dishes with natural aromas you ought to miss once your trip is over. If you are arranging sightseeing in Vietnam, the following places should not miss in your checklist.

Ho Chi Minh City
This is one of the famous contemporary cities of Vietnam, which dates back to the previous century activities. However, it has transformed to be one of the modern places with lots of opportunities and much for travelers to explore. While planning a trip to Ho Chi Minh City, dedicate a visiting day for the Cu Chi tunnels as this is the archive of the country’s latest history. Another must-visit place is the Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica to see the long-established French cathedral.

Hoi An
For those seeking to see the traditional crafts and structures owned by local people, the Hoi An is the place to be. It is the place for travelers to see the customary homes and interact with the local’s culture including traditional foods and their system of agriculture. More things to explore awaits you while in Hoi An. There are artifacts to see, religious teachings to listen, and cultural customs to learn.

Phong Nha
The caves of Phong Nha is another amazing place every traveler need to visit. The caves are in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites so that they can be preserved for the current and future generations. Just after getting out of the caves, a few meters away you will see a national park. It is a home to different animal species including monkeys, bears, snakes, and many kinds of insects.

Hue
The city has a lot of fun for travelers. As one of the historical cities that was inhabited by kings, some of the major ancient architectural structures are found here. One of the structures is the Citadel found in the city center. As you shop around, remember to order for some delicious traditional Vietnamese foods in any of the kiosks and booths near you.

Sapa
Ifyou love hiking, take your fun to the Vietnam mountains. A local guide can help you trail through the rice paddies, up and down the misty peaks while exploring the real wonders of nature. You will have great moments while hiking in the misty peaks.

Nha Trang
Your trip deserves some relaxation at the Nha Trang beach. You can choose to enjoy different types of watersports available or just opt for scuba diving. The place is so decent with beautiful resorts and luxury hotels.

Ha Long Bay
Lastly, complete your trip at the Ha Long Bay. There are lots of things to do for adults and kids. You will have lots of fun in the caves and jungles, while a boat trip along the Ha Long Bay will create a memorable excursion in Vietnam.

On the Road: The Tour de France

This summer the world’s most famous cycle race pedals off from Dusseldorf on 1 July. For the next three weeks, elite cyclists will compete stage by stage as they loop around Germany, Belgium, and France. Glory awaits whoever crosses the finishing line first in Paris on 23 July. All those who come behind can at least say they completed the gruelling 104th Tour de France.

The Tour de France itself is open only to professional cyclists, but that’s not to say that you can’t get a taste of the action. You can bike the same route, or follow stage by stage as a spectator. Here are the highlights you can expect to see if you follow the route, plus our practical tips to make it happen.

Dusseldorf

The very first stage of this year’s Tour de France starts and ends in the German city of Dusseldorf. It’s a flat 13 km time trial through the city streets, mostly along the banks of the Rhine and therefore wonderfully flat. You can follow a similar route on a guided bike tour of the city, or meander your own way through the Old and New Towns. The parks and tree-lined promenade by the riverside are particularly pretty, and a great way to ease yourself into cycling, especially if you’re not terribly fit.

Liège

Stage 2 of the Tour de France is a long distance stage: 203 km from Dusseldorf across the border to Liège in Belgium. There are two short climbs along the way, and you’ll see a great deal of western Germany’s countryside as you cycle.

Though this section of the route is not overly arduous, you will be spending a lot of hours in the saddle. It’s essential you wear the right shorts or tights to avoid chafing. Jack Wolfskin’s Gravity Flex Tights are stretchy and breathable, and importantly are also waterproof — helpful for the unpredictable weather in Northern Europe!

When you arrive into Liège, don’t be deceived by the first industrial appearances. Climb the Montagne de Bueren steps for a rewarding city view, and treat yourself to a well-earned beer at the top.

Troyes

Cycling and drinking wine may not always go together, but there are few things more pleasurable in life than biking through French vineyards. The organisers of the Tour de France know that well, and so Stage 7 runs 213 km through the vineyards of Burgundy from Troyes to Nuits-Saint-Georges. Champagne and Rosé des Riceys are just two of the local specialities: you can also keep your energy levels up with Troyes andouillette, Chaource cheese, and Prunelle de Troyes, a particularly potent prune-based liquor.

Bergerac

Competitors in the Tour de France take a much-needed rest day in the Dordogne before starting on Stage 10, the 178 km leg from Perigueux to Bergerac. The terrain here is a little hillier, but the rewards for visitors are ample: the famous cave paintings of Lascaux, truffles and foie gras for the foodies, and the attractions of Bergerac.

Bergerac’s Old Town looks as if it was made for tourism. The timber framed houses are medieval, there are lively markets in the squares, and you can wander along the bank of the Dordogne River down to the historic quay.

Rodez

By the time you reach Stage 14 (182 km), you’ll need to raise your game. The hills here might look photogenic, but as they rise higher and higher, your legs will start to burn.

Be grateful that you’re on a modern, lightweight bicycle. The first time that British riders competed in the Tour de France was in 1955, and their equipment and clothing looked very different indeed. The Wearwell Cycle Company, who sponsored riders in that first British team, have relaunched their collection in 2017, combining a hint of 1950s vintage style with the latest materials and designs. You can look the part whilst riding in complete comfort.

When you do get to Rodez at the end of the stage, inevitably you’ll be exhausted. Once you’ve recovered, do allow some time for sightseeing, however. Rodez’s cathedral is a masterpiece of gothic architecture; there’s an excellent circular walking tour around the Old Town; and the local park, Domaine de Combelles, covers 300 acres.

Salon-de-Provence

The longest stage of the tour, Stage 19, runs through the lavender fields and olive groves of Provence. It might look utterly idyllic but it’s tough on the legs, especially in the first part of the day. Even the pros are hard-pushed to complete the 223 km in under 17 hours.

You are heading for Salon-de-Provence. This year is the first time that the Tour de France has ever been through, though the town is a regular feature in other long distance road races such as the Paris-Nice Peloton. Come here to visit the 12th century Château de l’Empéri and the tomb of Nostradamus in the Saint-Laurent Collegiate Church. If your trip coincides with the Du son au Balcon festival in August, you’ll also hear the central square pulsing as DJs mix the latest tracks from the balcony of the town hall.

Paris

Everyone’s heard of the Maillot Jaune — the yellow jersey — of the Tour de France, and on the final race day, that’s what is on everyone’s mind. It’s considered bad form for other riders to don that colour shirt, but if you want to feel like a winner on your own bicycle ride, by all means flash some canary yellow.

The 21st and final stage of the Tour de France is from Montgeron through Paris to the Champs-Élysées. It’s a 103 km ride and when the roads are cleared for the race, classed as a sprint. If you’re competing with the Parisian traffic, however, your pace will inevitably be curtailed.

It’s in Paris that the excitement of the race builds to a peak, and where as a spectator you’ll find the best vantage points. Arrive in good time if you want a spot on the Quai d’Orsay or Pont Alexandre III; you stand a better chance in the grounds of the Grand Palais where there’s rather more room.

Watching the race reach its triumphal end on the Champs-Élysées is an emotional sight. And that’s even more true if you’ve cycled all — or even part — of the way yourself. Make time this summer for the Tour de France, the greatest cycle race of them all.

Great see sights on China

The unmoving landscapes of the Silk Road have enchanted travellers for millennia. Sights along the route have lasted down through the ages, from a time when monks travelled these roads bringing Buddhism back from south Asia, and traders exchanged silk for goods and spices.

Made up of a series of roads connecting Chinese capitals with south Asia, Europe and the Mediterranean, a voyage down the Silk Road remains one of China’s most epic journeys. Travelling the length of this route today, with its flaming red mountains, towering sand dunes and alpine lakes, still offers a very real sense of what ancient traders experienced. And in 2014, UNESCO listed the entire 5000km Tian Shan Corridor as a World Heritage Site.

Luckily, the Silk Road is ever-more accessible from the rest of Chinathanks to the opening of a new high-speed rail line through Xinjiang. This train will eventually connect the furthest reaches of China’s northwestern province to Xi’an, Beijing and beyond. Here we explore a must-see list of its east-to-west sights.

Army of Terracotta Warriors

Painstakingly cast as guardians for Qin Shi Huang’s – the first emperor of China – safe passage into the afterlife, the Army Of Terracotta Warriors was discovered in 1974. Since then, thousands of warriors, archers and chariots have been unearthed and remain on display just outside the city of Xi’an in Shaanxi province. Xi’an is the first stop along an itinerary of the Silk Road from east to west – it was the capital of Chinese empires variously in ancient periods and its strategic north-central location on the Guangzhong Plain makes it a gateway from eastern China to the wild west. Today, Xi’an is a busy provincial capital home to numerous ethnic minorities, mainly Hui Muslims.

Labrang Monastery

One of the most important monasteries in the Yellow Hat sect of Tibetan Buddhism, Labrang Monastery in Xiahe was once home to 4000 monks and echoes of a time when Buddhism passed through this part of the world on its great journey through China, from south Asia to the Far East. Today, Labrang Monastery is home to 1800 monks and its grand prayer halls and intricate yak-butter sculptures remain a draw for visitors and monks alike.